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COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE 

OF 
PHYSICIANS 

AND 
SURGEONS 

CLASS 

OF 

1984 


















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President 
of 

Columbia 
University 




Michael I. Sovern, L.L.B., 
L.L.D. (hon.) 



Provost 

and 

Vice President 

for 

Health Sciences 




Robert F. Goldberger, M.D. 



Dean 
of the 
Faculty of 
Medicine 




To the Class of 1984: 

My congratulations to each of you. I congratulate you not only for the 
completion of your arduous years in school but on your entrance into what I 
consider the most challenging and most rewarding of all professions. As 
graduates of one of the finest of all the world's medical schools, you are 
uniquely prepared to practice that profession. At the same time you bear a 
special responsibility, to maintain and uphold those standards of scientific 
skill and humanitarian conduct which have been the hallmark of this school 
for more than two centuries. I am confident you will make P & S proud of 
you. Good luck and best wishes. 

Donald F. Tapley, M.D. 

Dean 






Rediscovered 



National Gallery ul An 
Iunc28,l981-Ma>'2, 1982 








. 




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Associate 

Dean 

for 

Student Affairs 




For the Class of 1984: 

Changes!!! Changes have occurred since August 1980. 
Twelve of you have moved into other classrooms and 13 have 
joined the Class of 1984. You have matured through 3 Vice 
Presidents for Health Sciences. Three of 7 Associate Deans, 9 
of 22 Chairmen, and 16 of 38 Course Directors have changed. 
You paid $6,500 tuition in 1980 and $11,340 in 1983. Scho- 
larships given rose from $850,000 to $1,200,000. 

Yet the greatest changes have been in you. Coming into P&S, 
the Handbook noted your characteristics included kindness, 
diversity, leadership, stamina and intellectual curiosity. 
These have led you into a variety of postgraduate pursuits 
reflecting changes in modern medicine. You are entering oc- 
cupational, emergency and rehabilitation medicine, patholo- 
gy research, anesthesiology and radiology as well as medi- 
cine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology and family 
practice. Most of you have just begun making the decisions 
which will eventually lead to your specialty endeavors, and 
these decisions are being made with phenomenal insight, 
objectivity, concern and empathy. 

Your outstanding trait as a class is kindness, variously de- 
fined as natural grouping, species, manner, essence, cate- 
gory, affectionate, loving, sympathetic, forbearing, benign, 
merciful, gracious, and simply humaneness. These you 
brought with you and these you are taking with you as Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. I congratulate you on this achievement! 

Linda D. Lewis, M.D. 

Associate Dean for Student Affairs 



PsS Gu£ PsS C * PsS Cos 




President 
P & S Club 




Can you believe it's been four 
years already! I've been told 
that we have a truly special 
class and I couldn't agree 
more. The warmth and camar- 
aderie we have shared in these 
four years, I feel has supported 
us through many trying times. 
Best of luck to all in the future. 



Mark A. Rautenberg 



President 
Class of 1984 




To my classmates — 
Congratulations on finally making it! 
Never allow the path ahead to tarnish 
the basic personal qualities that have 
collectively made us the truly unique 
class: dedication, warmth, sensitivity 
and camaraderie. Thank you for afford- 
ing me the privilege of working closely 
with each of you. 



LeRoy E. Rabbani 



17 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



In colonial America formal medical education as we 
know it was nonexistent. The only means of obtaining 
training in the healing arts was via the apprentice 
system. The apprentice would care for his master's 
home, office, and perhaps his stable and in return 
would have access to his master's medical texts, if any, 
would be taught the preparation of prescriptions, 
bloodletting and other such effective treatments, and 
would be allowed to accompany his master on patient 
visits. There was no government regulation of 
physicians. On February 15, 1753 William Livingston's 
Independent Reflector addressed itself to "The Use 
and Importance of the Practice of Physic; together with 
the Difficulty of the Sciences, and the Dismal Havock 
made by Quacks and Pretenders." He wrote, in part: 

No man is of greater Service or Detriment to 
Society than a Physician. If he is skillful, 
industrious and honest he is of unspeakable 
Benefit to Mankind; but if incapacity, idleness 
and Roguery are his characteristics, he is a curse to 



By Robert Kimball 

the community. 

The city of New York in 1760 passed the first colonial 
law requiring physicians to pass an examination of 
basic competency, but exempted those already in 
practice. It was into such a setting that the Medical 
School of King's College was born in 1767. 

A group of six New York City physicians, all of 
whom had received medical degrees at universities in 
Europe, wrote to the Governors of King's College 
proposing the formation of a medical school and 
offering their services as professors. On August 14, 
1767 the Governors passed a resolution creating such a 
school, with the six physicians who had initiated the 
proposal appointed to the faculty as follows: Dr. 
Samuel Clossy, Professor of Anatomy; Dr. Peter 
Middleton, Professor of Physiology and Pathology; Dr. 
John Jones, Professor of Chirurgery; Dr. Samuel Bard, 
Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic; Dr. 
James Smith, Professor of Chemistry and the Materia 
Medica; and Dr. John V. B. Tennent, Professor of 




King's College circa 1760 



18 







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[(HiiiSliii 








College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1856 - 1887 



Midwifery. Jones. Middleton, and Clossy were all 
established, respectable New York City physicians. 
Jones was the foremost surgeon in the province, Clossy 
already held the Chair of Natural Philosophy (a field 
which included anatomy), and Middleton was a highly 
respected practitioner. The other three men were all 
recent medical graduates. Of the six. Samuel Bard had 
perhaps been best prepared for a teaching role. His 
father was Dr. John Bard who. in 1750, with the 
aforementioned Dr. Middleton. conducted the first 
instruction of anatomy through dissection in the 
colonies. Dr. Bard had originally come to New York 
City at the urging of Benjamin Franklin, and quickly 
came to be one of the most respected members of the 
medical profession. Samuel was apprenticed to his 
father for a time, then enrolled at King's College 
where, in his spare time, he received lessons in Greek 
and Latin. In 1762, at the completion of his third year, 
Samuel sailed to Europe to attend Edinburgh. He was 
a diligent student, took private lessons in mathematics 
and drawing and, over one summer, compiled a 
botanical collection which won the annual botanical 
prize. It is apparent that during his stay at Edinburgh 



he discussed the need for a medical school in the 
colonies with other American students, including John 
Morgan, who went on to found the medical department 
of the College of Philadelphia in 1765. Samuel realized 
his education entailed "considerable expense: but I 
hope I shall never repent it. and that it will some day 
be returned with interest." Bard's graduation thesis 
was a report of observations of the effects of opium on 
himself and his roommate. He concluded that opium 
was a sedative, not a stimulant. After receiving his 
M.D. in 1765. Samuel returned to New York to join 
practice with his father. 

A degree in Arts or satisfactory knowledge of Latin 
and natural philosophy was required for admission to 
the medical school. In order to receive a degree each 
student was required to have completed one course of 
lectures in each field and to have been enrolled for 
three years, although a three year apprenticeship would 
reduce this requirement to two years. At the 
completion of three years, the Bachelor of Medicine 
was conferred. Another year of study with the 
preparation and defense of a thesis was needed to 
acquire the M.D.. 

19 




Presbyterian Hospital — 70th Street and Madison Avenue 



The first commencement was held on May 16, 1769 
with two students receiving M.B.'s. In May 1770 
Robert Tucker received his Doctorate, thus establishing 
King's College as the first colonial school to award the 
M.D. in course. The College of Philadelphia awarded 
the M.B. in 1768, but did not award its first M.D. until 
1771. The first honorary M.D. to be awarded in the 
colonies had been conferred by Yale on one Daniel 
Tucker, a generous benefactor of the school, in 1723. 
Detractors of the action suggested that M.D. stood for 
Multum Donavit. Eighteen individuals received M.D.'s 
at King's College up until April 1776 when the college 
property was taken over for military purposes and the 
students dispersed. Of the faculty, only Drs. Jones and 
Smith served with the Continental Army during the 
Revolution; the others remained loyal to the Crown. 

In 1784 the remnants of King's College were 
resurrected as Columbia College under the authority of 
the Regents of the University of the State of New 
York. Bard was the only original faculty member 



remaining. One of the newcomers, Dr. Nicholas 
Romayne, would later exert a major influence on the 
development of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. Columbia, at least in part due to its history 
of strong ties to the Crown, had a very difficult time 
obtaining any support, and the members of the medical 
faculty received no salary from the College. Bard and 
Romayne soon left Columbia, and there were no 
medical graduates from 1784-1791. For all practical 
purposes the school ceased to exist. 

The Doctor's Riot of 1788 is, perhaps, the most 
notable event in the medical history of this time period. 
Dr. Richard Bayley, who later was affiliated with 
Columbia College and New York Hospital, was using 
one of the rooms of the vacant hospital to conduct 
private instruction in anatomy. An account of the 
events which ensued appeared in the New York Packet 
of April 25. 

On Sunday the 13th inst. a number of boys, 
we are informed, who were playing in the 



20 




From Left to Right — Vanderbilt Clinic, Sloane Hospital for Women, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1887 - 1928 




P&S Dissecting Room, 1887 - 1928 



21 




Neurological Institute — September 28, 1928 



rear of the Hospital, perceived a limb which 
was imprudently hung out of a window to 
dry; they immediately informed some 
persons — a multitude soon collected — 
entered the Hospital; and, in their fury 
destroyed a number of anatomical 
preparations; some of which, we are told. 



were imported from foreign countries — one 
or two fresh subjects were also found — all 
of which were interred the same evening. 

The anatomists were saved from the crowd by the 
actions of various local officials, but the people 
reassembled the next day with the intent of searching 
the houses of the suspected physicians. The militia was 



22 




Babies Hospital — October 29, 1928 



called out when the crowd could not be dissuaded 
peaceably, and in the confrontation which followed 
several rioters were shot and killed. The next year the 
New York Legislature passed a law to make the bodies 
of executed criminals available for dissection. This 
source did not provide sufficient anatomic material for 
dissection, and the practice of grave robbing continued. 

In 1791, Dr. Romayne asked the Regents for a 
charter for a medical school which he had established 
with several associates. The Regents favored such a 
plan but had to wait for the Legislature to pass 
enabling legislation on March 24, 1791. In the 
meantime the Columbia Trustees, spurred on by John 
Bard, convinced the Regents that they were in the 
process of upgrading their medical school, and so 
Romayne was denied his charter. Romayne continued 



his medical school through an affiliation with Queen's 
College in New Jersey until that school closed for lack 
of funds in 1793. 

Columbia, in 1793. gave up the practice of awarding 
the M.B.. principally because most of the students who 
received the M.B. did not go on to obtain the M.D. At 
this time New York State did not require physicians to 
possess any medical degree. Columbia's admissions 
requirements were more stringent than other private 
schools. For all of these reasons, Columbia continued 
to do poorly, and awarded only 31 Doctorates from 
1793 to 1807. 

In 1806 Dr. Romayne, having returned from an 
extended trip abroad, became president of the New 
York County Medical Society. As president of the 
Society, in February 1807 he petitioned the Regents for 

23 




incorporation of the Society as a College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. This request was granted on March 12, 
1807. although in granting the charter the Regents 
reserved for themselves the power to appoint 
professors, confer degrees, and to alter the school 
charter. Romayne was appointed Lecturer in Anatomy, 
and was elected President by the faculty. The school 
opened its first session in a rented house at 18 
Robinson Street with 53 students. The school grew 
rapidly and moved to Magazine Street (now Pearl 
Street) at the end of the second year. Problems arose 
within a few years when the Regents revised the school 
charter to take upon themselves the determination of a 
candidate's eligibility for a degree. They also acted to 
raise fees significantly. The fourth session opened in 
1810 with so few students that instruction in all courses 
save Anatomy and Chemistry ceased within a few 
weeks. Dr. Romayne and several other P&S faculty 
members resigned to form a private medical school. 
Instruction at Romayne's new school began in 
November 1811 with 100 students, the largest medical 
class in New York history at that time. This clearly 
indicates that a shortage of students was not the reason 
for the failure of P&S to attract them. 

One individual who figured prominently in this 
period was Dr. David Hosack. For some time he was 
simultaneously a member of the medical faculty at 
Columbia College and a Trustee of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. It seems that he served as a 
destabilizing influence for both institutions. One of 
Hosack's plans was to merge the Columbia College 
medical faculty with P&S. He had friends among the 
Regents, and convinced them that the Columbia faculty 
would be eager to unite with P&S. The Regents, in 
April 1811, released a new list of faculty appointments 
to P&S, including the members of the Columbia 
faculty, only to learn that these men had not been 
consulted and would not accept the appointments. In 
response, the Regents ignored Columbia in their 
annual report, and the Legislature withheld funding for 
Columbia. In spite of all of these difficulties the first 
P&S commencement was held on May 15, 1811 with 
eight students receiving M.D.'s. P&S moved to No. 3 
Barclay Street in 1813. An agreement was worked out 
between the Columbia medical professors and P&S, 
and in that year the professors accepted faculty 
appointments at P&S. This union might have been 
expected to bring about a stable medical institution, but 
differences remained between the Regents, Trustees, 
and the Faculty. The conflict came to a head in April 
1826 when the entire medical faculty resigned and set 
out to form a rival medical school. 

One small event of 1814 which later came to mean a 
great deal to Columbia College deserves mention. 
Columbia College, in a sorry state following many 

Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center 
February 26, 1926 



years of financial neglect by the Legislature, appealed 
once again for additional funds. In answer, the 
Legislature gave the Elgin Botanical Garden to 
Columbia. This was a 19 acre plot of land which had 
been purchased from the State and converted by Dr. 
David Hosack into a botanical garden before he later 
sold it back to the State. There were various 
stipulations placed on the use of the land which made 
it, in the short run, more of a burden than an asset. 
However, in later years (much later), various 
individuals took it upon themselves to construct on that 
site a collection of buildings which we know today as 
Rockefeller Center. 

The years 1826-1830 were difficult ones for P&S. A 
committee report of that time states that "the College 
generally presented the appearance of a city sacked 
and deserted by a ruthless enemy." Apparently, 
however, stability had been achieved. The class size 
grew and in 1837 the College moved to No. 67 Crosby 
Street. Prior to 1841 all instruction was conducted by 
didactic lecture, but in that year the College's first 
clinic was established. As growth continued, the length 
of the school term approached five months, the 
curriculum was broadened, and the clinics were 
increased to three per week. The Anatomical Bill of 
1854 made available for dissection the unclaimed 
bodies of institutionalized persons; anatomists were 
finally able to set aside their shovels, and a rear 
entrance to the medical school was no longer 
mandatory. The school moved to the corner of 23rd 
Street and 4th Avenue in 1856, and in 1859 the 
Association of the Alumni was formed. 

1860 was a banner year for the school for two 
reasons. First, the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York transferred control of the school to 
the P&S Trustees. Second, P&S was made the Medical 
Department of Columbia College, though the two 
institutions remained financially and administratively 
separate. The Civil War led to a decline in enrollment, 
but by 1876 the school had 413 students with ten 
separate clinics each week. The growth of clinical 
teaching parallels changes occuring widely in American 
medicine at that time. It must be remembered that even 
the clinical sessions were conducted by the professors 
in a lecture or demonstration format. Dr. Lewis 
Connor, an 1890 graduate of P&S, later recalled: 
"During the last two years we had a few clinical 
lectures in the Vanderbilt Clinic, but we never came 
within a mile of touching a patient." 

In the 1880's the College benefitted from the 
generous donations of the Vanderbilt family. In 1884 
William Vanderbilt donated land and money worth over 
$500,000 for the construction of a new college building. 
Vanderbilt died in 1885, but his daughter, Mrs. William 
Sloane, and her husband built and endowed the Sloane 
Maternity Hospital at a cost of over $900,000. 
Vanderbilt's sons funded the construction of the 
Vanderbilt Clinic. Enrollment continued to rise, 
reaching 809 in 1889 with many students from other 
states and foreign countries. The expenses for 1890 



were listed as follows: Annual tuition fees — $200; 
Table Board, 35 weeks — $125-140; Lodging. 35 weeks 
— $105; Textbooks, society fees, etc. — $15. 

1890 saw the first joint commencement of P&S and 
Columbia, with the Honorable Seth Low presenting the 
diplomas. In 1891 a formal union of P&S with 
Columbia was established, with the transfer of all P&S 
property to Columbia. This seems to mark the 
beginning of a period of self-betterment for P&S. The 
curriculum was expanded to four years in 1895. 
Admission requirements were gradually made more 
stringent, with the class entering in 1908 being the first 
which was required to have had courses in physics and 
chemistry. Accordingly, the class size decreased 
considerably, but the quality of P&S students 
improved. It was not until 1917, in keeping with the 
growing recognition of the rights of women, that the 
school admitted its first female students. 1908 saw the 
birth of the clinical clerk in New York City, with 
several hospitals opening their wards to medical 
students. All of these changes anticipated by some 
years the sweeping reforms which were instituted 
following the publication in 1910 of Abraham Flexner's 
findings on the state of medical education in America. 
A 1907 report by the AMA Council on Medical 
Education stated that some schools were "no better 
equipped to teach medicine than is a Turkish bath 
establishment or a barber shop." Flexner's findings 
tended to confirm such a statement. 

Another major event of 1910 was the establishment 
of an affiliation between P&S and Presbyterian 
Hospital which exists to this day. An agreement was 
reached which made the professor of medicine of P&S 
responsible for one half of the PH medical service. At 
this time P&S was located at 59th Street and 10th 
Avenue, and PH was across town at 70th Street and 
Park Avenue. Both institutions were desirous of 
relocating to a common ground, but this was delayed 
for many years by financial problems, disagreements 
over a location for the complex, and World War I. 
Planning for the medical center, the first of its kind, 
was begun in earnest in 1925. P&S. with the Sloane 
Hospital for Women and Vanderbilt Clinic, would join 
PH on a piece of land in Washington Heights. Babies 
Hospital and the Neurological Institute were included 
in the arrangement, and the State Hospital Commission 
added the New York State Psychiatric Institute. It was 
this complex which opened in 1928. Bard Hall was 
built in 1931, the Eye Institute in 1933, the Public 
Health Building in 1938, Harkness Hall in 1945, and the 
New York Orthopaedic Hospital in 1950. The '60s and 
'70s produced further growth with the following 
additions: William Black Medical Research Building, 
Atchley Pavillion, Bard Haven Towers, Alumni 
Auditorium, the new Babies Hospital and the Julius 
and Armand Hammer Health Sciences Center. The 
most recent addition, the Lawrence C. Kolb Research 
Laboratories of the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute, was completed during our years here. 






— [ 

■ 




College of Physicians and Surgeons — January 3. 1927 



27 



^^^^j^Vj^^^^^i^i^^^'u}}^!!}^^}!^^^^^^ 




28 



PRECLINICAL 
FACULTY 




29 



Anatomy and Cell Biology 





Dr. Michael D. Gershon 
Chairman, Department of Anatomy 




Dr. Eladio A. Nunez 



Dr. Karl H. Pfenninger 




30 



Dr. Ernest W. April 





Dr. Charles R. Noback 



Dr. Melvin L. Moss 






Dr. Sharon C. Colacino 



Biochemistry 





Dr. Isidore S. Edelman 

Chairman, Department of 

Biochemistry 



Dr. Allen M. Gold 




Dr. Alvin I. Krasna 



32 




% 



Dr. Richard Axel 



II* MjJJ 




Dr. Parithychery Srinivasan 




Dr. James L. Roberts 



33 



Human Genetics and Development 




Dr. William Johnson 




Microbiology 








Dr. Harold S. Ginsberg 
Chairman, Department of Microbiology 





Dr. Bernard F. Erlanger 




Dr. David H. Figurski 



Dr. Benvenuto Pernis 



35 



Nutrition 




Dr. Myron Winick 
Director, Institute of Human Nutrition 




Dr. Winick and Maudine 



36 




Pathology 



Dr. Phillip E. Duffy 
Chairman. Department of Pathology 




Dr. Jay Lefkowitch 





Dr. Karl Perzin 



Dr. Cecilia M. Fenoglio 



37 



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. i 





Dr. John J. Fenoglio, Jr. 



Dr. Donald W. King 




38 



Pharmacology 





Dr. Brian F. Hoffman 
Chairman, Department of Pharmacology 




Dr. Norman Kahn 



Dr. J. Thomas Bigger, Jr. 




39 




Dr. Douglas N. Ishii 




40 



Dr. Daniel J. Goldberg 



Physiology 




Dr. David Schachter 




Dr. Mero Nocenti 




Dr. John V. Taggart 
Chairman, Department of Physiology 




41 




Dr. Shu Chien 




Dr. Eric R. Kandel 




42 



Biostatistics, Epidemiology, 

Parasitology 




/ 



\ 



Dr. Dickson D. Despommier 





Dr. Joseph L. Fleiss 




Dr. David Rush 

Stephen N. 
Rosenberg 

The 

mm 




Dr. Stephen Rosenberg 






• NCML 






43 







44 



CLINICAL 
FACULTY 




rf 



45 



Anesthesiology 




Dr. Henrik H. Bendixen 
Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology 





Dr. Kevin V. Sanborn 




46 



Dr. Patricia Martin 



Dr. Ellise S. Delphin 



Dermatology 




Dr. Leonard C. Harber 

Chairman, Department of 

Dermatology 















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Dr. Robert Walther 




47 



Medicine 




Dr. Robert Glickman 
Chairman, Department of Medicine 






Dr. Henry Aranow 



Dr. Abbie Knowlton 



48 





Dr. Gerald Appel 



Dr. John Bilezikian 




Dr. Robert Canfield 



49 




Dr. Wylie Hembree 





Dr. Qais Al-Awqati 



Drs. Peter Green and Jeff Stein 



50 




Dr. Vincent Butler 





Dr. Andrew Frantz 



Dr. Glenda Garvey 




Dr. Ronald Drusin 



51 




Dr. John Loeb 





Dr. Harold Neu 



Dr. John Lindenbaum 



52 




ESf KM K: 

Dr. Carmen Ortiz-Neu 



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77 



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Dr. Elliot Osserman 




Dr. Thomas Jacobs 




Dr. Thomas Morris 



53 



Neurology 




Dr. Lewis P. Rowland 
Chariman, Department of Neurology 











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B 






Dr. Arnold Eggers 




54 



Dr. Niels L. Low 



Dr. Lucien J. Cote 




Dr. Carmen T. Vicale 




/ 



/% 




Dr. Daniel Sciarra 




Dr. Darryl C. DeVivo 



Dr. Richard Mayeux 



55 



Neurological Surgery 




Dr. Bennett M. Stein 
Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery 




PREMOTOR MOTOR 
AREA AREA 



rRUNK 

SHOULDER 




Dr. Edgar M. Housepian 



56 




Dr. Kalmon Post 





Dr. Peter W. Carmel 



Dr. John CM. Brust. Jr. 
Dr. W. Jost Michelsen 



57 



Ob/Gyn 





Dr. Henry C. Frick II 




58 



Dr. Edward T. Bowe 




Dr. Roy H. Petrie 




59 



Orthopedic Surgery 




Dr. Harold M. Dick 
Chairman, Department of Orthopedic Surgery 




NEW YORK ORTHOPAEDIC 
DISPENSARY gP HOSPITAE 

FOUNDED 1H«6 

(SOURCE) ANDRYS L'ORTHOPEDI fc . PARIS. 1741 




Dr. S. Ashby Grantham 



Dr. Robert E. Carroll 



Dr. David L. Andrews 



60 





V ** 



Dr. John R. Denton 



Dr. David P. Roye, Jr. 



Otolaryngology 




Dr. Maxwell Abramson 

Chairman, Department of 

Otolaryngology 




Dr. Soly Baredes 



61 



Pediatrics 



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1 




Dr. Stephen J. Atwood 




Dr. Michael Katz 
Chairman, Department of Pediatrics 




62 



Dr. Martin Nash 




Psychiatry 



Dr. Stuart C. Yudofsky 




Dr. Eric Marcus 





' 



Dr. Sidney Malitz 

Acting Chairman. Department of 

Psychiatry 



Dr. Stan Arkow 



63 



Radiology 




Dr. William B. Seaman 

Chairman, Department of 

Radiology 




Dr. David H. Baker 




Dr. Walter E. Berdon 




Dr. Kent Ellis 





64 



Dr. Sara Abramson 



Dr. John H. Austin 



Rehabilitation Medicine 



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Dr. John A. Downey 

Chairman, Department of Rehabilitation 
Medicine 



Dr. Stanley J. Myers 




Dr. Erwin G. Gonzalez 



65 



Surgery 




Dr. Keith Reemtsma 
Chairman, Department of Surgery 





Dr. Carl R. Feind 




Dr. George J. Todd 




Dr. Alfred M. Markowitz 



Dr. Mark A. Hardy 



66 





Dr. John B. Price, Jr. 



Dr. Sven Kister 





Dr. Philip D. Wiedel 



Dr. Kenneth A. Forde 





Dr. Robert G. Bertsch 



Dr. Paul LoGerfo 



67 





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Dr. Thomas C. King 









Dr. Eric Rose 





Dr. Henry M. Spotnitz 




Dr. Fred Bowman 



Dr. James R. Malm 



Urology 




Dr. Carl A. Olsson 
Chairman, Department of Urology 




.A 



^ 




Dr. John K. Lattimer 






Dr. Peter J. Puchner 



69 



In Memoriam 








Dr. Raymond L. Vande Wiele 




70 



— 



Dr. Hymie L. Nossel 



Bard Hall 






71 



Dean's Office 




iiu** 




r^- 




Alumni 
Association 





Tony's Desk 




73 



College of Physicians &" Surgeons of Columbia University | New York, N. Y. 10032 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE 630 West 168th Street 



February 1, 1980 
Dear Applicant, 

I am happy to inform you that you have been admitted to the next entering 
class of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, which is to be enrolled in September 
of 1980. You have survived as arduous a selection process as we have ever experienced 
and we are pleased to have this opportunity to welcome you to student me m be rship in 
the medical profession. 

Most of you have already comp leted our entrance requirements. If you are one 
of the few who has not, you should be aware that this offer of admission is contingent 
on completion of all of our requirements before enrollment in PSS, and an receipt of 
your transcript. We must have a copy of the current version of your transcript as 
soon as possible. When your final transcript is ready, please have your registrar 
send us a copy of that as soon as possible. If we do not receive the copy of your 
final transcript by August 1, 1980, we will not be able to continue to reserve a 
place for you in our next entering class: if, however, you cannot have a copy of the 
final version sent to us by August 1, 1980, please tell us why before July 13th. 

You will find information about the probable costs of your first year here 
enclosed, as well as a description of our financial aid policies and a questionnaire 
which will be used to help us to determine the extent of your need for financial aid. 
If you intend to apply for such aid, please send off the completed questionnaire as 
promptly as possible. 

If you decide to accept our offer of admission, no fee will be required to 
ensure your place in our next class. You will receive subsequently information about 
our orientation and enrollment schedule. Please consult it as scon as you receive it 
for you will be expected to enroll on the date indicated. If you will not be able to 
follow this schedule, please notify us as much in advance as possible. If you decide 
subsequently to enroll elsewhere, however, the Ccrmlttee on Admissions requests that 
you inform us of your change in plans as soon as you can. The Committee also requests 
that you respond to our offer of admission by the date indicated on the line beneath; 
for your convenience, an envelope has been enclosed. If we do not receive your reply 
by the date indicated, we will assume that you do not intend to enroll in our school. 

February 22, 1980 



Because our Committee on Admissions has formed so high a regard for your 
potential contributions as a physician, I hope that your reply will be 
favorable. In any event and regardless of where you ultimately enroll, please 
regard this offer of admission as an expression of our pleasure at having met 
someone so well suited to the medical profession. 

Sincerely, 



^-MJLvudL^. 




Frederick G. Hofmarih, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean for Admissions 



74 




rafruates 




75 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 






Elijah S. Adkins, III 

Surgery 



Robert Aldoroty 

Surgery 



David Alland 

Medicine 




Michael Arato 

Surgery 





76 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 




Duffield Ashmead 

Surgery 




I 




Ana L. Baez 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 



Kyra H. Bannister 

Pediatrics 





James T. Belisle 

Pediatrics 



77 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Alan S. Berkower 

Otolaryngology 




Gail M. Booker 

Pediatrics 






Alessandro S. Boschi 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 





78 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 






Rachel F. Brem 

Radiology 



David B. Brieff 

Medicine 



Mariel Brittis 

Surgery 




79 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 






Michael C. Brown 

Transitional 



Amitabh Chak 

Medicine 



Stephen Chan 

Radiology 





80 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




K.^ 




Michael Chietero 

Anesthesiology 





Kenneth Christopher 

Transitional 





Streamson Chua 

M.D. Ph.D., Pediatrics 



Michael R. Clain 

Otolaryngology 



81 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 




Kenneth D. Coburn 

Family Practice 




«£*. 





Sally E. Cohen 

Medicine 



82 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 




Terry S. Desser 

Radiology 



Matthew J. DiFranco 

Medicine/Pediatrics 




Aspasia E. Draga 

Ophthalmology 





83 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 






Regis F. Fallon 

Orthopedic Surgery 



Donald C. Fithian 

Orthopedic Surgery 



George R. Gewirtz 

Medicine 





Mark P. Goldberg 

Neurology 



84 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




■:.. 

Jeffrey A. Goldstein 

Surgery 




Christopher P. Gorton 

Pediatrics 



Alok Goyal 

Medicine 





85 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Wayne B. Graff 

Anesthesiology 





Ellen H. Guthrie 

Medicine 



Linda E. Greenbaum 

Medicine 





COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 







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Claire A. Hibbard 

Radiology 






Louis A. Ivey 

Surgery 



Ho-Wen Hsu 

Pediatrics 



Byron A. Jackson 

Medicine 



87 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




DIED OF ".'I"' "> ' ' ■"• «»•»■"'"—- 
WHII.E SERVIM. IN Till: 

PUBLIC HOSPITALS Of NK« YORK 
THIS TABLET 

IS ERECTED BY THE I LI I IT\ 
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MARTYRS OF HUMAN! TN 

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Valluvan M. 
Jeevanandam 

Surgery 





Gregory K. Johnson 

Orthopedic Surgery 



Peter S. Johnston 

Medicine 



88 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Kethy M. Jules 

Medicine 





Michael Kazim 

Ophthalmology 



Scott M. Karlin 

Otolaryngology 




Collins F. Kellogg 

Medicine 




89 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Anthony H. Kim 

Psychiatry 





Robert O. Kimball 

Surgery 



Kami Kim 

Medicine 






90 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 







Andrew Ku 

Radiology 




Arnon Krongrad 

Urology 



Thomas P. Lang 

Ophthalmology 



91 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 





Carlo P. LaScala 

Medicine 





Neil Levin 

Medicine 




Mark A. Leibenhaut 

Radiology 



Laura Liberman 

Medicine 



92 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Gregory T. Lombardo 

Psychiatry 





Israel Lowy 

M.D. Ph.D., Medicine 



Karen A. Love 

Pediatrics 




'"•'& i : . : s \&) 



Averil I. Ma 

Medicine 




93 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Jeffrey Magnes 

Anesthesiology 





Arlene H. Markowitz 

Otolaryngology 



John H. Mahon 

Orthopedic Surgery 




Donald M. Mathews 

Anesthesiology 



94 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Steven Z. Miller 

Pediatrics 





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Frank E. Modic 

Radiology 




Barbara L. Milrod 

Psychiatry 



William J. Moss 

Pediatrics 



95 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Kevin P. Mulvey 

Medicine 




jm nmm 





Steven M. Neustein 

Anesthesiology 



Katherine Nimkin 

Radiology 



96 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Douglas R. Nordli 

Pediatrics 





Richard M. O'Keeffe, Jr. 

Orthopedic Surgery 



Marc G. Odrich 

Ophthalmology 




Janet L. Olsen 

Anesthesiology 




97 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Beatriz Rodriguez Olson 

Medicine 






Eric J. Olson 

Orthopaedic Surgery 



Maria A. Oquendo 

Psychiatry 




James Palma 

Medicine 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Barbara A. Palmer 

Rehabilitation Medicine 





Michael Pearl 

Rehabilitation Medicine 



Ann M. Pawlowski 

Transitional 







Sandra C. Peinado 

Family Practice 




99 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 





I I 

Benjamin C.H. Peng 

Urology 




Robert T. Pero 

Epidemiology 




Deborah Pfeffer 

Psychiatry 




100 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 





Brian Quinn 

Emergency Medicine 




C^4 wJ 




LeRoy E. Rabbani 

Medicine 



Maritza Proano 

Medicine 




Mark A. Rautenberg 

Surgery 



101 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Elizabeth G. Raymond 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 









Andreas M. Reimold 

Medicine 




Philip J. Reilly 

Surgery 



Douglas A. Rennert 

Medicine 



102 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




James M. Roberts 

Surgery 





John Rottkamp 

Anesthesiology 



Thomas Romano 

Medicine 




103 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Frank Ruiz 

Medicine 





Annabelle V. Santos 

Medicine 



Vincent R. Saladini, Jr. 

Anesthesiology 



104 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



CLASS OF 1984 




Robert E. Schoen 

Medicine 




© 









Norman Schoenberg 

Radiology 




Cary C. Schwartzbach 

Orthopedic Surgery 




Donna M. Scuderi 
Radiology 



105 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 





: -. ' % ------ 

:.' i. 



Neal E. Seymour 

Surgery 




Meriamne B. Singer 

Psychiatry 




106 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Stefan Somlo 

Medicine 





Mark F. Sorensen 

Psychiatry 



Robert T. Speirs 

Radiology 




John R. Spriegel 

Occupational Medicine 




107 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Mark D. Stegall 

Surgery 





Philip J.S. Stork 

Pathology 



Rafael J. Tamargo 

Surgery 





108 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Faye Teichman 

Pediatrics 






Robert J. Tilley 

Surgery/ENT 




Dominic J.F. Tong 

Family Practice 



109 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




ti 



Ramon A. Torres 

Medicine 





Maureen Turey 

Psychiatry 



Pamela A. Weber 

Ophthalmology 







110 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 



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Robert B. Westermann 

Medicine 




James H. Whitehurst 

Medicine 



Markus A. Whitley 

Radiology 



in 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Mary E. Whitlock 

Medicine 




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Julia L. Winston 

Psychiatry 



Rebecca S. Witham 

Surgery 



112 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Shing-Chiu Wong 

Medicine 




Kenneth H. Wong 

Surgery 



Catherine Yen 

Medicine 




Jeffrey C. Yuen 

Radiology 




113 



LATECOMERS 




Robin E. Bell 

Psychiatry 




Cynthia A. Florin 

Psychiatry 




Gilda Cardenosa 

Radiology 




Michael R. Egnor 

Surgery 





Phillip S. Freeman 

Psychiatry 



Jean G. Ford 

Emergency Medicine 



114 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Christopher L. Gonzalez 

Medicine/Pathology 




Marsha K. Hyll 

Medicine 




Jeffrey S. Graham 

Emergency Medicine 





Kenneth L. Haspel 

Orthopedic Surgery 



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Douglas G. Lattimer 

Medicine 



Katherine Kaye 

Pediatrics 



115 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




Yvonne Luyando 

Family Practice 





James W. Roberts 

Medicine 



Kevin T. McDonagh 

Medicine 




/ 




David L. Schriger 

Surgery 




Phyllis Schmiedeberg 

Medicine 



Andrey S. Shaw 

Surgery /Pathology 



116 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1984 




G. Joseph Wiedermann 

Medicine 




Robert L. Wirth 

Radiology 



M.D. Ph.D. 



«* 




Jonathan Barasch 





Peter Kao 



Brian Gallay 




George 
Yancopoulos 



117 



ACTIVITIES 

& 

CANDIDS 




"It is an o2d, hut true axiom that the closer the 
patients' <37HjS is to the microscope , the better tVie 
technicians' chances are of Finding r^ovmg tropho- 
zoites of E. hi_stol^ii£d ! " * 

* Columbia 7><S. Parasitic diseases Lab Manual , Sp ri "g l962 - 




GiarcUa . 
* Columbia P.^3. Parasitic diseases Lab Manua] , Jpring 1*82 



118 



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"ZEST WISHES TO THE 
CLASS OP 'g^ 

The Zucker -Rat 



CONGRATULATIONS 
from the 

DEAN AND FACULTY 

of the 

COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



164 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS 

AND A 
WARM WELCOME 

TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS -- 
THE CLASS OF 1984 



165 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 1984 

Now that you're starting out in your medical 
career, you'll be spending so much time examining 
the health of others, you may not have time to 
examine the state of your own finances. So while 
you're helping your patients keep physically fit, 
our goal is to keep you fiscally fit. 

As a student, you've had the benefits of Chemical's 
free checking and a ChemBankcard. As a recent 
graduate, you're also invited to take advantage of 
Chemical's free financial counseling as well as 
financial planning seminars specially designed for 
health care professionals. 

It's Chemical's way of not only wishing you 
career success, but of ensuring your financial 
success, too. 

Chemical Bank Chemical Bank 

Richard Donatuti, Branch Manager Fleming Graffini, Branch Manager 

1 146 St. Nicholas Ave. Main Lobby 

(at 167th Street) Columbia Presbyterian Hospital 

N.Y., NY. 10032 168th Street, N.Y., N.Y. 10032 

ChemicalBaink 

THE CHEMISTRY'S JUST RIGHT AT CHEMICAL 

Member FDIC 



166 



Congratulations Class of 
1984 
from 

The Department of 
Psychiatry 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 

OBSTETRICS & 

GYNECOLOGY 

EXTEND THEIR WARMEST 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE CLASS OF 1984 



Best wishes for the future 

years. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



167 



to t\\t 

Class ai 1984 

from l\]t 



168 



The Department of Urology 

Wishes to Congratulate the 

Class of 1984 and Extend Best 

Wishes for a Successful Future 



Congratulations to the Class 

of 1984 

from the Staff of 

The New York Orthopaedic 
Hospital 

Department of Orthopaedic 

Surgery 

Columbia — Presbyterian 

Medical Center 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF '84 

DEPARTMENT OF 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY 



169 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS of '84 



170 



BEST WISHES! 

ANATOMY 

PATHOLOGY 

PHYSIOLOGY 

MICROBIOLOGY 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

PHARMACOLOGY 



171 



The Department of Pediatrics congratulates the 
outstanding members of the graduating class and 
all those who chose fields other than Pediatrics, 
as well. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO A 

BRAINY 

CLASS 

DEPARTMENT OF 
NEUROSURGERY 



BEST WISHES 

FROM THE 

COLUMBIA 

HEALTH SCIENCE 

LIBRARY STAFF 



172 



Overlook 
Hospital 



A MAJOR TEACHING AFFILIATE OF THE 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



Overlook, known for its progressive leadership and sound medical practice, is considered one of the nation's 
foremost community hospitals. 

A voluntary, non-profit health care center. Overlook provides extensive modern facilities, including 551 beds 
and 50 bassinets. More than 1900 employees and a medical staff of 450 offer a broad spectrum of educational and 
medical-surgical services. 

At Overlook, quality patient care has been a tradition for more than 75 years. We emphasize the training of 
primary physicians. Approved residency programs are offered in: Dentistry: Diagnostic Radiology: Emergen- 
cy Medicine: Family Practice: Internal Medicine: Pediatrics; and a Transitional First Year. 

Overlook also offers affiliated programs with Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and St. Vincent's 
Hospital and Medical Center. New York City, in General Surgery. Urology and Obstetrics-Gynecology. 
Program directors are outstanding physicians, all Board-certified specialists in their respective fields. 

At Overlook the administrative and medical staff constantly evaluate new concepts in the delivery of health 
care, never losing sight of the individual, human needs of the patient and the family. It is this commitment to 
excellence in family-centered care that has earned Overlook its outstanding reputation. 

For information about residency programs at Overlook, contact the Department of Medical Education. 193 
Morris Avenue. Summit, New Jersey, 07901, or call (201) 522-2085. 







173 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the Class of 1984 

MORRISTOWN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

a major teaching affiliate of 
Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons 



CONTINUE YOUR MEDICAL 
EDUCATION WITH . . . 




The New England Journal of Medicine 

For over 170 years, the Journal has reported advances in 

medical science and treatment to physicians and medical 

students throughout the world. Special rates are available to 

both residents and students. 

1440 Main Street • Waltham. MA 02254 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 

CLASS OF 1984 

from the 

COLUMBIA CENTER DELI 



174 



(212)357-9096 


(516)829-9292 


Hellman Construction Co. Inc. 
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 


JACK HELLMAN 
RON HELLMAN 


79 WATERMILL LANE 
GREAT NECK. NY 11021 







CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF '84 

BARD HALL MANAGER AND STAFF 

BRIAN CURRIE 

MARY CARMEN WILTZ 

MARY SMITH 



175 



CONGRATULATIONS, COLLEAGUES ! 

The Medical Society of the State of New York 

420 Lakeville Road 

Lake Success, N.Y. 11042 

(516)488-6100 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1984 

SIDNEY A SASS ASSOCIATES, INC. 
Association Group Insurance Administrators 

for 

THE ASSOCIATION OF THE ALUMNI 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

Columbia University 
200 Madison Ave. New York 10016 212-696-4780 



176 



Congratulations to the Class of 1984 




We at Columbia Medical Center Bookstore extend our congratulations to 
the members of the class of 1984. We hope that our books have helped you 
to build a firm foundation for your careers and we look forward to 
accommodating your future educational needs. 

The Columbia University 

Medical Center Bookstore 

Medical Center 650 W 168 Street New Vork 10032 Tel (212) 694-4044 

a service of Barnes & Noble 



We carry an extensive selection of the most current medical textbooks 
and microscopes, as well as current cloth, paper and sale books. We also 
offer a monev savins text buvback service. 



177 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1984 

THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ANESTHESIOLOGY 

WISHES YOU A LIFE FREE OF PAIN 
HENRIK H. BENDIXEN, M.D. CHAIRMAN 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST 

WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF 1984 

from 

THE FACULTY AND STAFF 
DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY 



178 



CONGRATULATIONS 

AND BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL 

CAREER 

DEPARTMENT OF 
RADIOLOGY 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to the CLASS OF 1984 

THE DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION 

MEDICINE 



179 



PARENT'S FUNDRAISING 
CAMPAIGN 



The Yearbook Committee of the Class of 1984 wishes to thank the 
following parents and friends for their generous contributions to 
the 1984 P&S Yearbook Parent's Fundraising Campaign: 



BENEFACTORS 

David Aldoroty 

Duffield Ashmead III 

Carol Johnson Bald 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold K. Bell 

Nicholas J. Brittis, M.D. 

Kam F. Chan, M.D. 

Streamson Chua, M.D. 

Mrs. Ann K. Lombardo 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert Love 

Dr. and Mrs. A.M. Markowitz 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Odrich 

Angel Oquendo, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin B.K. Peng 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent R. Saladini, Sr. 

Deborah Jean Saladini 

R. James Seymour, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank C. Sorensen 

Dr. and Mrs. William B. Spriegel 

Thomas K.K. Tong 



180 



PARENT'S FUNDRAISING 
CAMPAIGN 

PATRONS 



Rachel Frydman Brem 
Geoffrey Clain 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon P. Guthrie 
Burton B. Pfeffer, M.D. 
David & Lilly Schwartzbach 



SPONSORS 



Herbert L. Goldstein 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Gorton 

Kurt & Marilyn Greenbaum 

Richard M. O'Keeffe 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren H. Palmer 

E.J. Pawlowski family 

Werner & Anna Schmiedeberg 

Frank. V. Scuderi 

Dr. & Mrs. Jack Spitzberg 

Gilbert Stork 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert T. Whitlock 

John S. Winston, M.D. 



DONORS 



James N. Bannister 

Alan V. Brown 

C.A. Bucknam, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Pat Chietero 

Patricia C. Fithian, in memory of William S. Fithian, II, M.D. P&S '49 

Mrs. Charlotte Karlin 

Dow Lowy 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Mathews 

George S. Mauerman, M.D. 

Al Mitchell. M.D., P&S "82 

Raymundo J. Santos, Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Herman C. Schoen 

Isac Schoenberg 



181 



Yearbook Staff 



Artwork 

Neal Seymour 

Photography 

Eric Olson 
Ben Peng 



Editors 

Annabelle Santos 
Vinny Saladini 

Staff 

Louis Ivey 
Kethy Jules 
Scott Karlin 
Robert Kimball 
Andy Ku 
Karen Love 
Eric Olson 
Ben Peng 
Mark Rautenberg 
Cary Schwartzbach 
Julia Winston 

We would like to express our thanks to the following people, without whom this 
yearbook would not have been possible: 

— The Faculty, for their intellectual, emotional, and financial support 

— Those parents who contributed to our Parent's Fundraising Campaign 

— Barbara Howells, P & S Club Administrative Aide 

— Joe Donovan and the Hunter Publishing Company 

— Ed Thornton, our Class Photographer 

— Our sponsors, for advertising in our book 

and special thanks to: Steven Gerst for lending us his talent and Neil Freeman for 
his patience and hospitality. 










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The Hippocratic Oath 

"You do solemnly swear, by whatever each of you holds most sacred 

That you will be loyal to the Profession of Medicine and just and 
generous to its members 

That you will lead your lives and practice your art in uprightness and 
honor 

That into whatsoever house you shall enter, it shall be for the good of 
the sick to the utmost of your power, your holding yourselves far aloof 
from wrong, from corruption, from tempting of others to vice 

That you will exercise your art solely for the cure of your patients, 
and will give no drug, perform no operation, for a criminal purpose, 
even if solicited, far less suggest it 

That whatsoever you shall see or hear of the lives of your patients 
which is not fitting to be spoken, you will keep inviolably secret 

These things you do swear. Let each of you bow the head in sign of 
acquiescence 

And now, if you will be true to this, your oath, may prosperity and 
good repute be ever yours; the opposite, if you shall prove yourselves 
forsworn." 



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